Author: Jacob

JSON-Fortran 5.3.0

JSON-Fortran 5.3.0 is out. This release includes a few minor bug fixes and a couple of new features. For one thing, it is now possible to easily build or modify a JSON structure without using pointer variables. Here’s an example: As

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Binary Search

Binary search is a search algorithm that finds the position of a target value within a sorted array. The following binary search routine is taken from NASTRAN, a venerable finite element analysis program from NASA: As you can see, it is a scene of FORTRAN

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Latest Library Updates

I just released some updates to my two most popular Fortran libraries on GitHub: JSON-Fortran and bspline-fortran. Coincidently, both are now at v5.2.0. Details of the updates are: JSON-Fortran There are several new features in this release. The biggest update

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Fortran CSV Module

The lowly CSV (comma-separated values) file never gets any respect. Sure, it isn’t really standardized, but it is a very useful text file format for columns of data, and is frequently encountered in science/engineering fields. Of course, there is no good

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Multidimensional Linear Interpolation (Part 2)

In an earlier post, I mentioned that we needed an object-oriented modern Fortran library for multidimensional linear interpolation. Well, here it is. I call it finterp, and it is available on GitHub. It can be used for 1D-6D interpolation/extrapolation of data on a regular

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Numerical Differentiation

I present the initial release of a new modern Fortran library for computing Jacobian matrices using numerical differentiation. It is called NumDiff and is available on GitHub. The Jacobian is the matrix of partial derivatives of a set of \(m\) functions

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GOTO Still Considered Harmful

For a number of years I have been familiar with the observation that the quality of programmers is a decreasing function of the density of go to statements in the programs they produce. — Edsger W. Dijkstra One of the classics

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Fortran at 60

Today marks the 60th anniversary of the release of the original Fortran Programmer’s Reference Manual. Fortran was the world’s first high-level computer programming language, was developed beginning in 1953 at IBM by a team lead by John Backus. The first compiler was

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Computing Pi

The digits of can be computed using the “Spigot algorithm” [1-2]. The interesting thing about this algorithm is that it doesn’t use any floating point computations, only integers. A Fortran version of the algorithm is given below (a translation of the Pascal program

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Backward Compatibility

“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” — Antoine de Saint-Exupéry The Fortran standards committee generally refuses to break backward compatibility when Fortran is updated. This is a good

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